Friday Apr 09, 2004

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Now Francisco and Bernardo, they was guardin' the castle,
Leanin' on their spears, not lookin' for no hassle,
Havin' themselves a brew or two,
When out in the night they hear woooo-woooo-wooo.
And here comes this ghost, lookin' ragged and rank,
In a rusty suit of armor, goin' clank, clank, clank.
They say, "Hey, Mr. Ghost, are you our dear departed King?"
But the ghost...
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signalnoise:

hey hey hey -

i liked your points about despite being a relativist, still having some sense of objectivity. i was talking to a former prof (a posty thru & thru) and a colleague (another posty) this past weekend. and, backing you up, they both said much of the same thing: while they may not think there are 'absolute truths' out there, that is not the same thing as thinking there is not objectivity (a way to understand the causes, effects of social events).
perhaphs in some ways - to go out on a limb of pure conjecture here - being a relativist makes you *more* objective. in other words, you are not beholden to some prior explanation (marxism, colonialism, rational human action, whatever) for a phenomenon. rather, you can investigate an event from a number of differnet places - and might be more willing to accept explanations from a number of different fields.
and bring on the street hamlet! smile

tartpop:

did you post that in my journal once when i requested witty banter?

robot

Wednesday Apr 07, 2004

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I spoke of you as my secret sharer
to whom my life knows many paths;
I named you: the one all children know,
the one all strings are stretched across,
the one for whom I'm dark and still. (Rilke)

The task before us is neither to describe the unconscious nor analyze it, as though we were third party to its clandestine acts, this "we...
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legionnaire:

I loved your comment about the middle class being food for the rich. So true, on so many levels.

What do you think of psychoanalysis? I've only ever taken an introductory course in psychology (a survey level class) so my impression was rather poor. Is there more to it that I don't know? The concept of the 'unconscious' to me seems more like something that consists of personal symbolism rather than concrete, abstract ideas.

nic:

Bob is a cunt. I am going to kill him.

Monday Apr 05, 2004

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It is a commonplace that we are (in general) social creatures; even the most obnoxious of us are involved in some way with our fellow humans. Some theorists even argue that language exists, not as a tool for the individual to express themselves, but as a means of expressing relationships. That is, that which is societal reconstitutes itself on us through language acquisition. This is...
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neko:

we ARE all doomed.
thank you for the advice.
i think yuo're right in more ways than you realize.

nic:

Why thankyou. blush

Thursday Apr 01, 2004

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"And the world will be judged by you . . . Know you not that we shall judge the angels?"

I am preoccupied by the ego today. I know that it is a commonplace for religions, primarily eastern, to argue that the ego gets in the way of enlightenment, that the ego is illusion. But I like my ego -- it's my best friend. Think what a dull...
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acheron:

non serviam indeed.

the only reason the ego isn't ok in eastern religion is that it becomes a form of attachment to this world and to a life you're not going to keep, which will only lead to more suffering, instead of anatta (the concept of non-self). oddly enough, the christians have a similar concept, except that they tend to explain it poorly (it has a lot of history behind it in order to make sense) which would be the saintly process of kenosis (the purging of self in order to let god in). it's based in the idea of: "in the absence of man, god is found. in the absence of god, man is found". i love porete's version of it, even though she was considered heretical. there's a great foundation for anarchism/political reform and the reform (relig) in her work. i would also say she's heavily based in the tradition of the hedones, which lends a certain egoism to her style of thought. anyway, you may want to prod her.

and i'll assume you must know stirner by heart. even if he is demented. and of course the ego is vital to art. four words: james constantine aloysius joyce.

india:

your entries always make me think confused

Tuesday Mar 30, 2004

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"The metric system's the tool of the devil! My target's forty rods to the hog's head, and that's the way I likes it!" (Grandpa Simpson).

Did you know there is actually a book about philosophy and the Simpsons? I can't recall the name of it off-hand, but it explores all the "deep" questions of philosophy by their appearances in Simpsons...
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signalnoise:

there's also a book about the philosophy of the matrix .. i picked it up. and it wasn't for me.... but it's still a cool idea smile

by & by, while i have always been big into comics ... it's funny b/c i totally agree that in some ways the 'comic book' medium maybe is meant to be translated to film always. something just doesn't quite *work* (look at the costumes - what are superhero costumes made out of? cloth looks silly - but something about latex isn't quite right ... they just ARE ... they only make "sense" really in the 2D medium - tho "spiderman" could be the exception: the one movie that made it work..but whatever!). anyway ... some comics seem so perfectly realized in their 'paper' form .. i cringe a bit when i think about them becoming movies ... it's a bit like having you favorite novel made into a flick. there's something cool about seeing it "come to life" - but it always seems to fall short, so the experience is a bit of a let down too.

signalnoise:

say there -

interesting point about graphic novel vs. comic book. i guess the disagreement was a bit of a semantic one? i tend to think of a grapic novel as any collection of 'comic book like material' (picture panels w/words). so, most of the graphic novels *i* pick up were originally published as monthly comic books - and then were collected into a 'graphic novel format.' ... but yea, i see the difference you're getting at: some "original" material published as graphic novels has a different tone that might make it better suited for film.

hope all is well in your neck of the woods. smile

Monday Mar 29, 2004

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"We have [either] no dreams at all, or interesting ones. We should learn to be awake the same way -- not at all, or in an interesting manner" (Nietzsche).
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signalnoise:

hey there -

so you saw & felt the pain that was "league of extraordinary gentlemen" (that's a hard title to type by the way...). yea - that was pretty nasty. i remember i saw it w/a friend and he was like "well that wasn't so bad" .. and i could only respon w/sort a grin (like the one you might give just before you vomit heheh) and a shrug. i mean, sure, it's always fun to see kooky over the top adventure ... but whew. have you read the source material - the comic book version of "league of extraordinary gentlemen" ? it's actually super-cool: fun & smart. dunno if you're into that kind of thing .. but worth checking out.

india:

hm...interesting confused

Saturday Mar 27, 2004

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"But one must go out beyond the desert, farther, always in the same direction. Only he who does that will know what lies on the other side of solitude -- and thus why one seeks the desert. And he will not become lost and will not grow tired and his death will not act as though he had never existed" (Rilke).
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neko:

i agree with you. and disagree with you. Bestiality IS quite disgusting. I'll give you that much. And, morals may be relative, but I wont give you that they are not innate. Many belive (and this is argued often) that they ARE innate, or apriori. This is the argument of most religions, and of Kant, of course, the greatest ethisist to exist. He says that there is a universal set of morality (or categorical imperative) that we may put to test in a variety of ways, but ultimately, that all human kind must abide to because it IS inherent to humanity.

nice quote, way the by.

neko:

oh, trust me, i dont mind. I too struggle with relativism, but am not ready enough to consider myself a relativist. there are too many slippery slopes. While i am madly in love with Kant (not so much his theories, just him- i just think he had a brilliant mind), there are points in his arguments that are not all that convincing to me either. Yet, all I was trying to point out is that even though the categorical imperative or other philosophies like it might be weak, they still exist, and thus there are people that believe that morality is innate. For this reason, we can only say that "for ourselves" morality is not innate, but there is no way we can come to a concensus about the "objective world" or "objective morality" for that matter.
-neko

Friday Mar 26, 2004

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"Hi, ummm . . . le'me have one of those porno magazines . . . large box of condoms . . . bottle of ol' Harper . . . couple a those panty shields . . . aaaaand one a those disposable enemas. Nah, make it two."

More wit and wisdom from Homer Simpson: How to get your weekend off to a great start!
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polly:

offended? me? haha biggrin

i guess my post came off like that. that happens sometimes, but i can assure you, i saw the humor in your post.

xoxo biggrin

evil:

how about parasites in the pudding!!! wink

puke

Thursday Mar 25, 2004

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"To be modern -- is this not really to know that one cannot begin again?" (Roland Barthes).

There are those thinkers who believe that none of us are truly modern -- that for our entire lives we live only our past, playing out the same events with the same consequences again and again. Whatever mistakes we've made in our past, whatever victories we claim as our...
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rachel:

that, my friend, you will never know... *muahahahaha* biggrin

rachel:

hahahahaha!!! smile

Wednesday Mar 24, 2004

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"I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space -- were it not that I have bad dreams." [Hamlet]

This is one of my favorite quotes from Hamlet because it is at once so ironic and so true. Regardless of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern's argument that the mind defines for itself its own boundaries, Hamlet points out that if the...
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velocity:

I LOVE THE WORD POOP!!

Seriously, it's a very funny word.

lauren:

breath-taking compliments, thank you*

Tuesday Mar 23, 2004

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[Burns] Never forget Homer . . . there's no muscle stronger . . . than the human heart.

[Homer] What about the wiener? A guy on tv lifted a can of paint with his.

[Burns] Yeessss.
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velocity:

Well, I'm in the middle of the long process of moving to the other side of the world. I take it as the dream just telling me I'm on track.

london:

biggrin

Monday Mar 22, 2004

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"Parents should never try to teach us life; for they only teach us their life" (Rilke). It is up to each of us to discover our own life.
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signalnoise:

i think the last thing i need to tell my wife is that my "internet friends" think she is wrong. that's like just asking for an ass whooping wink

nice quotation today - but then it raises the next question: apparently the job of a parent is to help you discover life, but how is that done? it sounds really hard....

tryst:

I have received much wisdom from my parents; however, my life looks nothing like theirs and has taken a very different direction. It's how you use the wisdom that matters, and the ability to seperate actual wisdom from personal opinion.