Sunday Apr 01, 2012

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I really suck at keeping this updated.

In my defense, this isn't the only online journal I have. Of course, I don't update that, either.
idgas:

Happy Birthday to another of the great CE posters.

Sunday Nov 08, 2009

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OK, so if I needed to keep this up to date to save my life, I would be dead several times over.

It's been a really interesting time for me since my last entry. (14 months ago? Really)
Two biggest things:
1 - Bought my first house. Very interesting process, not as bad as I thought.
2 - Fired my first employee. Much more "interesting" process...
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clidna:

^^^What he said.

idgas:

ibid!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Saturday Sep 06, 2008

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Y'know, I've said it before. And I will undoubtedly say it again. I REALLY suck at updating this thing.

I mean, it's been a fucking year and a half since my last entry. That's bad.

But, anyway.

So, the past week has really been interesting. For background, let me point out that I spent the 2004 hurricane season in central Florida...
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sockpuppet:

No criticism intended, and I'm well aware you're very active here. It's just a style difference, I guess.

And, thank you smile

issue_:

that is by far the BEST profile picture i have EVER seen.

Saturday Jan 27, 2007

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So, I'm finally here in the Crescent City.

Started the new job two weeks ago, and am enjoying (?!) finally having the kind of position that my investment in a degree has earned me. Director of Biomedical Engineering for Children's Hospital of NOLA. WooHoo!!

After a pretty grueling drive down here - Boston to NOLA in two days (whew!) - I've been staying in a...
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sureality:

Hi there!

zarth:

Happy birthday.

Sunday Dec 17, 2006

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urblueygrl:

Im not in NOLA right now but i may still have friends over at childrens hospital. Hope everything works out for you and if you have any questions bout the area and such i might be able to help :o)

et_ux:

Things are odd, frustrating, and wonderful in New Orleans, if you have a place to live and no insurance companies to worry about. Right now I don't think folks much care if you've moved in from Zimbabwe, as long as you want to live in the city and enjoy it.

Saturday Dec 09, 2006

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burningkrome:

Good luck. I lived in NOLA for about three years...but I haven't been there since Katrina. I have family down there and they say the city is on its' way to recovery. Don't forget to do all the touristy things :-)

Saturday Nov 04, 2006

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Ok, ok, ok.

Update!

So, I had a pretty good vacation. Backpacking/climbing trip in Colorado. Same place as last time (2004)
A little background on the location:
Back in the stone age, when I was 12 years old, my two older brothers and I took a backpacking trip to a beautiful wildernes area in CO. The three of us, and two weeks worth of...
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sockpuppet:

To be honest, yes it was. I'd gone out on a limb and proposed a course which would be very unpopular everywhere, and I wasn't sure if you'd mistaken me for a gung-ho "military solutions to all problems" type. And I try not to get into public snarkfests with people whose politics I basically agree with - I've seen that happen before, and it only gives aid and comfort (and giggles) to the other side.

So yes, I wimped out completely. biggrin

sockpuppet:

Also, looks like you had a fine time. I'm not sure how wise it is to defy mountains to their face (as it were); they have long memories, I'm told. But that's a damn fine view smile

Sunday Jul 16, 2006

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huntersmencken:

That's the thread where I first heard of the band, too. F'ing amazing. Hadn't even heard of them before, let alone seen their Brit Award vid. Now I've got it running almost non-stop in a background window when I'm online.

alistairmather:

"The concept of dark matter was proposed to explain the motion of stars within galaxies, then later of galaxies within clusters. Specifically because things at those scales didn't seem to jibe with our understanding of orbital mechanics as observed and reinforced in our own solar system. The motion of our own planets was well described before Newton came up with Universal Gravitation as an explanation, and fit (nearly) perfectly with its predictions. Any slight differences between observed planetary orbits and Newtonian mechanics were explained by Einstein. No dark matter needed there."

This is a really well written, if somewhat logically puzzling, piece. I commend you on your knowledge of the history of physics. Really. Its a mostly unknown thing to the greater populace as a whole. However....

First, your implication that Newton's Universal Gravitation theory "fit (nearly) perfectly with [earlier] predictions" is kind of foolish. I mean, of course it fit. He based the entire theory on those observations and predictions. This is one of the flaws of science. Since there is no outside perspective, a mediator outside human perception, if you will, science has only its own word, its own limited observations on which to base itself. Any theory we develop is limited by this, and being so is fundamentally flawed by the very logic science is based on (see any college level Symbolic Logic text) .

This brings me back to the point of my post: that the difference between science and religion on a logically fundamental level are non existant. Science's most common argument against the veracity of Christianity is that it relies entirely on a single document, written by people who set out intentionally to write proof of their beliefs, to justify thier faith. Science, meanwhile, is an institution that, while definitely ascribing to much more rational means of discourse, relies on a series of observations and principles to explain what it has observed, operating under the assumption that the limited scope of its equations and observations have to work. You will accept that as a species that can actually observe only an infintesimally impossible to define amount of space in a constantly expanding universe that this is flawed reasoning.

As for dark matter being used to describe only massive celestial bodies, well we ourselves occupy a universe that exists inside of one of these celestial bodies, and if dark matter accounts for ninety percent of all matter in these bodies, logically it would also account for a hefty percentage of our own small corner of space. This said. wouldn't it imply that our own understanding of planetary motion is flawed, as it does not take into account dark matter and yet functions perfectly?

Once again, this returns to the heart of my post. Science, faced with a clear failing in one of their theories, did not go back and reexamine its own ideas, but rather invented a massive, invisble form without proof of observable phenomena (and yes, I have read the recent articles concerning radio telescopic images of dark matter around two crashing nebulae, I side with the sceptics on that one, as an action at that leve is well beyond our understanding of astrophysics at this point). Me, I can't seperate the difference between the invention of dark matter to explain why our understanding of gravity failed from that of some Christian inventing God to explain why life fails.

Taking all that into account. I do not ascribe to Christianity, Islam, Judaism or Hunduism. I studied BioChemistry for four years and have a healthy respect for the sciences. However, as a thinker, I cannot simply accept the state of science as it is. Einstein's theories are unraveling at a rapid pace these days, what with the University of Tokyo demonstrating that the speed of light has degraded over the course of universal history, and the rising support for String Theory, which completely denies the bulk of Einsteinian physics (nothing against Einstein. Brilliant man and without his flawed theories we would not have been able to acheive the understanding we have now). However, I also do not discount any or all of the above mentioned faiths (including science) and am open to believe just about anything in a universe that is constantly expanding, infinitely allowing for more potential, more possibilities.

I would like to see a world without ignorance, and this means that you rather have to embrace a larger amount of viewpoints, not fewer. In the end, the proponents for both science and religion are demanding our attention with why they, and only they, are right. Science may be willing to admit it doesn't have all the answers, but it has a little bit of trouble admitting when its wrong.

Post Script: For further on why theories on massive bodies can be linked to smaller bodies in an infinite amount of recursion, I suggest Richard Feynman's "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom". A beautiful lecture he gave on quantum minutae and why the universe repeats itself infinitely from the quasar to the quark.

Thursday Apr 06, 2006

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andvari:

Nothing says yumm like the bile of young maker.

andvari:

Ohh, that water of life...MUCH better.
That will certainly put the celebration into your step, and would probably cure me.